Conclusion and references for Sex Hormone Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

By: Dr. Jessa Landmann, ND, Jan 28, 2019
  Article
Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis, Naturopathic Doctor in Calgary Alberta.

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Conclusion In limited clinical trials, estriol induced a remissive state via its ability to provoke an immunological shift from a TH1 proinflammatory state to a TH2 anti-inflammatory state, and is of therapeutic benefit in women with RRMS, but not SPMS. Additionally, there is emerging evidence that supports the use of testosterone as a therapeutic agent in men with MS. While testosterone has not been shown to induce remission in male patients, it does appear to play a role in both the inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes of MS.

Progesterone might also mitigate the neurodegenerative process, in that it stimulates remyelination. Future research should be aimed at further understanding the pathogenesis of the disease, and fully understanding the mechanisms of action of sex hormones as well as their relationships with each other and with immunological processes. 6 Journal of Orthomolecular Medicine Vol 27, No 2, 2012 

Sex Hormone Treatments for Multiple Sclerosis

 Estrogen Treatment and MS

 Testosterone Treatment and MS

Competing Interests: The author declares that she has no competing interests.

References

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Dr. Jessa Landmann is passionate about helping people living with cancer. From reducing the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation to guidance on eating a healthy, preventative diet, she can help at all stages of cancer. She is passionate about helping people living with cancer. From reducing the side effects of chemotherapy and radiation to guidance on eating a healthy, preventative diet, she can help at all stages of cancer.

100% of Dr. Landmann's patients state that a major problem with the health care system is the gap in care once conventional therapy has come to a close. There is very little guidance on how someone can proactively fight the disease and prevent recurrence and even less support with helping them to recover from the intense side effects of chemotherapy and radiation.

Her practice focus is what is called integrative oncology, which is a field of medicine that focuses on the modern practice of medicine while acknowledging the wisdom of traditional healing.

She received the Bachelor of Science from the Univesity of Calgary and the Doctor of Naturopathic Medicine from the Canadian College of Naturopathic Medicine

How to contact me

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