Is it possible to fix a high arch or flat feet with orthotics?

By: Tom Lemke - Cped MC, Cped C, Jun 28, 2017
  Article
Edmonton, The Foot Lab, Foot Pain

If so how does it work?

What a great question, a high arch or flat feet is not a problem foot or "wrong" so it doesn't need to be "fixed".

I have seen a high arch become lower by the client wearing an orthotic with significant realignment structures built into the orthotic but the client ended up with plantar fasciitis pain for years afterward. I've also seen very flat feet with bunions and hammer toes return to almost completely normal looking feet in one year but that client was a high level athlete that religiously did the exercises that we gave her to strengthen her feet as well as wearing the orthotics all the time.

So it is possible to cause some realignment of the foot or parts of the foot with an aggressive orthotic but more often than not an aggressive orthotic causes a significant amount of pain, enough so that the client stops wearing them and ends up without the outcome we were hoping for.

My strong tendency is to accommodate rather than correct, it's more comfortable and tends to bring about a more positive result.

Tom Lemke has been making custom footwear for Canadians for over 30 years.

Tom became a Certified Pedorthic Master Craftsman in 1996, and a few years later in 2003 he started his own orthopedic, orthotic and pedorthic practice: The Foot Lab. Located in Edmonton, Alberta, The Foot Lab serves clients from Grande Prairie to Nova Scotia and beyond.  Check out our website http://www.footlab.ca/ 

Our Certified Pedorthic Master Craftsman will create custom-made shoes, inserts, insoles and/or footwear modification to help you:

  • improve your walking posture, putting less stress on your body;
  • relieve foot, leg, or back pain from walking and standing;
  • walk more naturally with differently-sized legs or a partial or full amputation; and
  • relieve pain and improve balance problems caused by chronic health issues like diabetes or cerebral palsy.